Broadway Hits $36M: Mel Brooks Fills Seats, ‘Mockingbird’ Sets Record & ‘Beetlejuice’ Scares Up Personal Best

To Kill A Mockingbird broke the $2M ceiling, a best-ever weekly figure for an American play; exact number at the Shubert was $2,018,314;
11, with a tour and a Netflix movie to follow; The Prom, at the Longacre, showed a slight increase at the box office last week, grossing $700,279, a bump of $61,967 from the previous week, but still only 67% of potential. The musical closes Sunday, Aug.
Attendance for the 35 productions was 296,070, just about dead even with last week.
potential and 71% of attendance capacity. Also about to depart is Be More Chill, which posted an Aug. 11 closing notice of its own. The Joe Iconis musical grossed $459,379 last week at the Lyceum, showing a Prom-like spike of $42,819, but still hitting only about 52% of b.o.
A still-growing Beetlejuice had its best week yet at the Winter Garden, $981,335, about 69% of potential; attendance of 10,570 was about 89% of capacity;
All My Sons, starring Annette Bening and Tracy Letts, played to houses 92% full last week, while Kiss Me, Kate, with Kelli O'Hara in the title role, played at 95% capacity. Also closing this month, as scheduled, are the nonprofit Roundabout Theatre Company productions of All My Sons and Kiss Me, Kate, both giving their final performances June 30.
Ink, now in its final two-week stretch at MTC’s Samuel J. Bertie Carvel's Tony win for Best Featured Actor/play doesn't seem to have had much lasting impact, money-wise, though the point is moot: After two extensions, the production has to put a cap on it Sunday, July 7; Friedman Theatre, took in $397,578 last week, about 3% less than the previous week.
The complete roster of sold-out productions (or nearly so, at 98% of capacity or more) for Week 4 was Ain't Too Proud, Aladdin, Come From Away, Dear Evan Hansen, Frozen, Hadestown, Hamilton, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Mean Girls, Mel Brooks, The Book of Mormon, The Lion King, To Kill a Mockingbird, What the Constitution Means To Me and Wicked.
Among the stand-outs for the week:
Season to date, Broadway has grossed $140,493,449, off about 10% from last year at this time. Total attendance to date is 1,201,475, just shy of 1% more than last year at this time.
(The unscripted show was probably very funny – critics weren't invited.) The $583K figure marked 112% of potential, with average ticket price hitting $197. Brooks' June 17-18 engagement at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre had a total attendance of 2,967, 99.2% of capacity.
All figures courtesy of the trade group Broadway League.” />
Mel Brooks played to full houses during his two-night Broadway stand last week, adding $583,140 to Broadway's overall pot of $36M for the week ending June 23.
The critically lauded play starring Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow was one of a batch to post early closing notices after the Tonys offered no effective lifesavers; Hillary And Clinton played its last performance at the Golden on June 23, taking in $302,871, a wispy 37% of potential.
In all, Broadway's total box office for Week 4 of the 2019-20 season – $35,987,055, to be exact – held steady with the previous week, showing a tiny 4% boost. (Receipts for the five-show Regina Spektor residency at the Lunt-Fontanne will be reported cumulatively next week).

Broadway Box Office Springs To $40M With ‘Tootsie’, ‘Hadestown’, ‘Burn This’

Hillary and Clinton, starring Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow opened April 18, with 97% of the Golden's seats filled. Receipts for the three previews and five regulars totaled $340,825, about 42% of potential;
Season to date, Broadway has grossed $1,649,156,032, about 12% better year to year. Attendance of 13,213,039 was up 11% over last year at this time.
And finally Beetlejuice, opening April 25 at the Winter Garden, grossed $797,929, a more than decent 68% of potential for the seven previews. Attendance of 10,375 was just a shade below sell-out.
Ain't Too Proud, the Temptations jukebox musical, is another powerhouse, grossing $1,396,582 at the Imperial.
Expect some settling into position over the next couple weeks, not to mention bumps (or not) from the around-the-corner Tony Award nominations on April 30. But strong competition among the newcomers, press comps and opening night freebies kept ticket prices for some shows at modest levels.
Ink, the British import about the early Fleet Street days of Rupert Murdoch, opens April 24 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, and like some of its fellow newcomers, showed sturdier attendance (92% of capacity) than box office: $316,263, about 44% of potential;
All My Sons, the nonprofit Roundabout's Arthur Miller revival starring Annette Bening, Tracy Letts and Benjamin Walker at the American Airlines Theatre, opens tonight; the final full week of previews took in $482,132, about 60% of potential, with attendance at 96% of capacity;
Hadestown was SRO at the Kerr, with receipts tallying up to $776,253 for two previews, six perfs including the April 17 opening night;
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child had its one-year Broadway birthday today, and the magic shows no signs of letting up, new cast and all: The highest grossing play in Broadway history took in $2,021,091;
Total revenue for Week 47 (ending April 21) was even more impressive as the 36 productions took in $40,219,790, 16% greater than the previous week. Spring tourism and a plump roster of new productions filled lots of seats on Broadway last week, with attendance of 328,200 reflecting a solid 8% increase over the previous week.
Let's take them in opening night order:
Tootsie, opening April 23 at the Marquis, was at 96% of capacity, grossing $907,612 for 54% of potential (again, opening night comps played a part);
The week's sell-outs – or close enough, with attendance at 98% of capacity or more – were Ain't Too Proud, Aladdin, Beetlejuice, Burn This, Chicago, Come From Away, Dear Evan Hansen, Frozen, Gary: A Sequel To Titus Andronicus, Hadestown, Hamilton, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Kiss Me Kate, Mean Girls, Network, Oklahoma!, The Book of Mormon, The Lion King, To Kill a Mockingbird, What The Constitution Means To Me and Wicked.
A couple other notables:
With two previews and six regular performances, Burn This grossed $768,766; Burn This, starring Adam Driver and Keri Russell in the Lanford Wilson revival at the Hudson, has few empty seats these nights, with Driver's quotable reviews following the April 16 opening doing whatever lifting still needed doing – the duo's star power has been drawing audiences for weeks.
Gary: A Sequel To Titus Andronicus opened at the Booth on April 21 to reviews more mixed than they should have been. Taylor Mac's comedy starring Nathan Lane and Kristine Nielsen grossed $300,613, about 35% of potential for seven previews and the opening night. Seats were filled – 98% of them anyway – but the comps and maybe some pre-opening confusion about what, exactly, this Gary thing is all about kept average ticket price at 50 bucks;
All figures courtesy of the trade group Broadway League.” />

Broadway Box Office Steady At $34M; ‘Burn This’, ‘Hadestown’ Preview Strong

Oklahoma!, the reimagined classic musical at Circle in the Square, played to full houses, taking $599,132;
Attendance was at 80% of capacity. King Lear, starring Glenda Jackson, grossed $640,045 at the Cort, about 71% of potential.
Opening night is April 16; Burn This was down about 6% from the previous week, a slip that can be chalked up to five heavily comped press performances. The Lanford Wilson revival starring Keri Russell and Adam Driver at the Hudson Theatre took in $762,998.
So in chronological order: A roster of eight previewing productions awaited opening nights that will unfold over the next couple of weeks.
Season to date, Broadway has grossed $1,608,936,242, about 12% greater year to year. Attendance of 12,884,839 was up 10% over last year at this time.
All My Sons, starring Annette Bening and Tracy Letts  at the non-profit Roundabout's American Airlines Theatre, took in $424,814, with 92% of seats occupied. Opens April 22;
With all of its new spring arrivals up and running, Broadway box office held about steady from the previous week, a good sign given that two fewer shows were on the boards during Week 46 (ending April 14). In all, the 36 productions took in $34,725,461, with attendance of 304,463 down a small 3.4% from the previous week.
Hadestown, the remarkable musical re-telling of the Orpheus myth, was SRO at the Walter Kerr, grossed $688,422, about 81% of potential. Opens April 17;
With an average ticket price of $87, attendance was at 84% of capacity. Tootsie, at the Marquis, grossed $821,781, a middling 55% of potential. Opening night is April 23;
Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus, the Taylor Mac comedy starring Nathan Lane and Kristine Nielsen, played to Booth houses 94% full, but with average ticket prices a modest $67, the $388,549 b.o. Opening night is April 21; was about 45% of potential.
Some other notables of the week:
Hillary and Clinton, starring Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow at the Golden, also had a press-heavy week, with grosses of $375,438 reflecting about 46% of potential. Attendance of 5,960 filled about 95% of seats. Opens April 18;
Attendance of 4,421 was 87% of capacity. Ink, James Graham's London hit about the early Fleet Street days of Rupert Murdoch starring Bertie Carvel and Jonny Lee Miller, took in only $321,953 at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, just about 44% of potential. Opens April 24;
To Kill A Mockingbird, a sell-out, grossed $1.5M, a small dip from the previous week due to a discount matinee for New York City public school kids;
Beetlejuice, the musical adaptation of the Tim Burton favorite, scared up $686,456 at the Winter Garden, 59% of potential. Attendance was 91% of capacity. Opening night of April 25 will bring down the curtain on the Broadway season's new shows.
All figures courtesy of the trade group Broadway League.” />
The week's sell-outs – or close enough, with attendance at 98% of capacity or more – were Come From Away, Dear Evan Hansen, Hadestown, Hamilton, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Oklahoma!, The Book of Mormon, The Lion King, To Kill a Mockingbird, What The Constitution Means To Me and Wicked.

Annette Bening Set For ‘All My Sons’ Broadway Revival; Tracy Letts To Co-Star

The limited engagement at Broadway's American Airlines Theatre runs through June 23. Additional cast and the design team will be announced soon.
Annette Bening and Tony Award winner Tracy Letts will star in director Gregory Mosher's Broadway revival of Arthur Miller’s classic 1947 drama All My Sons. The Roundabout Theatre Company production, announced today, will begin previews April 4, 2019, with an official opening April 22.
The production will mark Bening's return to the New York stage following her performance opposite John Lithgow in the Public Theater's 2014 Shakespeare in the Park staging of King Lear. Onscreen, she recently starred in Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool (2017) and 20th Century Women (2016). Bening made her Broadway debut in 1987 with a Tony-nominated performance in Tina Howe's Coastal Disturbances.
All My Sons is set in the aftermath of WWII, as a long-hidden secret threatens the Kellers.
Actor/playwright Letts won, among other awards, a 2008 Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award for writing August: Osage County, and a 2013 Tony Award for his portrayal of George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Bening and Letts will play Kate and Joe Keller, the grieving parents of a missing World War II soldier. Casting of the couple's surviving son, Chris, has not been announced.
The play was last seen on Broadway in 2008 starring John Lithgow, Dianne Wiest, Patrick Wilson and Katie Holmes. A London production starring Sally Field and Bill Pullman is planned for an April 2019 opening at the Old Vic.” />